just a few words in black

Thursday, January 31, 2008

Air Ambulance

helicopter

Sorry - I've been out of commission for the last few days as this pic may indicate. So I have been unable to concentrate on my theme 'patterns of nature'. I have however begun another photo blog called "a photo from tomorrow" through which I concentrate more on the life around me - as a kind of personal diary of events. The quality of the photography may not be a high as I expect from this photoblog - but as stated it is more of a personal photographic documentation of my life. You can check it out here.




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Wednesday, January 23, 2008

Kruger National Park - Southern Africa

kingfisher

This hot New Zealand weather is reminding me of our 2006 summer in Africa. Here is a photo from that time. A kingfisher perched near our car at Krugar National Park and posed for a photo shoot. I was able to explore the kingfisher through my Canon 55-300mm lens, from the confines of our car (somewhat restricting) - and it was most co-operative.


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Sunday, January 6, 2008

Gannet Soaring

Ganent drybrush sml

This photo is available for purchase. Specifications: Canon 20D, 300dpi, A4, no watermark. This photo has had a drybrush filter added. Purchase for $5





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Saturday, January 5, 2008

New Zealand's Gannets

gannet composition

The trick at Muriwai, with the gannets, is to be able to capture the soaring birds in mid flight and still have the focus square on their eyes. Sometimes just getting the bird in the frame was challenge enough!! I also found that my desperate attempts to engage that perfect flying shot - meant I missed some great action on the rocks. It was good to have family around to point out the interesting going-ons amongst the bird's active community.



Gannet flying



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Gannets

gannets

When had a great time winding our way to Muriwai Beach on the wild West Coast of Auckland, to see the new born chicks. What an amazing sight. I could watch for hours as the birds communicate with each other - stroking each others necks, tapping each others beaks, nudging, flapping. I watched one gannet enjoying a piece of seaweed - he was tossing it up in the air and catching it - over and over again. He was watched by two other gannets and the three of us seemed fascinated by the skill of this one gannet. Until one of the intrigued gannets stepped forward, plucked the seaweed from the air above the unsuspecting player, and scurried over to his mistress with it. She proceeded to tuck the seaweed around her chick as if to say 'At last - I thought you would never pluck up the courage?'. No wonder there are people who can study these creatures for a lifetime.




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